Schools failing to achieve averages

Grove Lea Primary School score above the national average in the primary school league tables 'Pictured L/R: India Simmons, Leia Charlesworth, Kian Edwards and Josh Thompson.
Grove Lea Primary School score above the national average in the primary school league tables 'Pictured L/R: India Simmons, Leia Charlesworth, Kian Edwards and Josh Thompson.

EXAM results at almost 90 per cent of primary schools across the Express area are below the national average, the latest league tables show.

Only two out of 17 schools achieved the national average of 79 per cent of students achieving the expected level four in both maths and English.

Upton and Grove Lea were the only schools in the area which met the average – with both having 83 per cent of pupils achieving level four in maths and English.

Sally Henshall, deputy headteacher at Grove Lea, said: “We are really proud of our results and it’s down to the hard work of our staff and the children.

“It’s also about making sure you have got good staff and getting to know the children.”

The Express reported earlier this month how almost two thirds of primary school pupils in the south east of the Wakefield district were receiving a poor education.

West End Primary School saw just over half of its pupils achieve the expected level.

And just 58 per cent of pupils at both Carlton Junior and Infant School and St Helens gained a level four in maths and English.

Sally Kincaid, divisional secretary of Wakefield and District National Union of Teachers said: “The use of league tables as a means to measure achievement in primary schools only proves to be detrimental to the local education system.

“Instead of promoting fair access to education for all, it creates a tiered system where some schools are better than others.”

School league tables are produced every year from official data published by the government on pupils’ achievement in England and are based on SATs exam results, which are taken by children in year six.

Across the country, the Wakefield district was one of the worse performers overall.

Schools where less than 60 per cent of children attained level four are considered to be under-performing by the government.

Three out of the 17 schools across the south east failed to meet the 60 per cent target.