New firm succeeds busted Eric France

Paul Garside and Philip Walker from Trinity Metals - A new scrap metal company which has been set up on the old Eric France site in Ossett. (W553D338)
Paul Garside and Philip Walker from Trinity Metals - A new scrap metal company which has been set up on the old Eric France site in Ossett. (W553D338)

Meet the new scrap metal team hoping to create jobs, after setting up shop at the site of a company which went bust.

Trinity Metals is the new occupant at Embassy Works in Ossett, the former home of Eric France, which went into administration with the loss of 18 jobs in February.

The new firm acquired the site as part of the liquidation of Eric France after spotting a gap in the market for a new scrap metal firm.

Trinity Metals director Paul Garside said the firm would be offering metal recycling services to individuals and contract clients.

He said: “Looking at the potential of the business, we thought it was a good opportunity for the area.

“It’s in a great geographical location and has a big catchment area.

“We are starting off small and hopefully will be able to grow the business as turnover increases, which will necessitate us employing some more staff.”

Mr Garside said Trinity Metals was well-placed to adhere to tough new guidelines on the processing of scrap metal.

He said: “Everything is very transparent with a paper trail for everything you take in and everything you sell on.

“You have to sell to reputable people.

“The systems we have put in place mean there is traceability right down the line, and that will benefit long-term contract customers who need that traceability.”

JKL (Wakefield) Ltd, which traded as Eric France Metal Recycling, was known for its scrap metal adverts on the backs of buses around the district.

The Church Street firm was the main shirt sponsor of Wakefield Wildcats and also sponsored the East Stand at the club’s Rapid Solicitors Stadium in Belle Vue.

The firm ceased trading in February with debts of around £22m. At the time, liquidators said the company had “significant historic debts owed to HMRC”, thought to total £21m in unpaid VAT.

KPMG was handling the disposal of the company’s assets, and confirmed it had sold the JKL Wakefield premises as part of that process.