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Launch of the LGI Major Trauma Unit, at the Leeds General Infirmary..Sarah Johnson (left) and Amy Firth both survivors of the M62 Mini Bus Crash, support the Trauma Unit...SH1001852b 1st September 2014 Picture by Simon Hulme
Launch of the LGI Major Trauma Unit, at the Leeds General Infirmary..Sarah Johnson (left) and Amy Firth both survivors of the M62 Mini Bus Crash, support the Trauma Unit...SH1001852b 1st September 2014 Picture by Simon Hulme

Two women involved in last year’s horrific M62 hen party minibus crash have given their backing to a new charity helping survivors of major trauma rebuild their lives.

Sarah Johnson and Amy Firth were joined by others involved in serious accidents to launch the Day One scheme at Leeds General Infirmary.

They have linked up to help others whose lives are turned upside down by the devastating injuries they have suffered.

Day One aims to improve the quality of life of patients from across Yorkshire who are cared for at the hospital’s Major Trauma Centre. The organisation – set up by a Leeds professor and a group of patients – will provide those affected and their families with emotional support as well as practical assistance.

Ms Johnson and Ms Firth were among 20 women hurt in April last year when the minibus they were travelling in crashed on the M62 near Pontefract, an accident in which their friend Bethany Jones died.

Ms Firth suffered severe pelvic injuries and feared she might never walk again. She has since undergone numerous operations and, after intensive physiotherapy, has now regained her mobility.

The 26-year-old, from South Elmsall, said the accident had changed her life but she was trying to look to the future.

“Things will never be the same but I am back at work a couple of hours, I’m just trying to get on with things and make the best of it.”

Both say they want to support the charity in recognition of the care they received at LGI.

Ms Firth said: “The trauma ward was just amazing. That made it a lot easier, being on a ward like that.”

Ms Johnson, also 26, said: “We want to do it on behalf of all the other girls who went through this with us. It’s a really great charity and I’m proud to be a part of it so we can help people in similar circumstances.

“When you come out of hospital, that’s when the reality starts to hit and it’s hard knowing where to go for advice. Day One is where you can get advice and help from.”

Prof Peter Giannoudis, from the charity, said: “From simple advice and education through our website, to legal and financial support from our experts, we know how tough the journey is and will give the right help at the right time.”